National ITS Architecture Glossary

 

Architecture

A framework within which a system can be built. Requirements dictate what functionality the architecture must satisfy. An architecture functionally defines what the pieces of the system are and the information that is exchanged between them. An architecture is functionally oriented and not technology-specific which allows the architecture to remain effective over time. It defines "what must be done," not "how it will be done."


 

Architecture Flow

Information that is exchanged between subsystems and terminators in the physical architecture of the National ITS Architecture. Architecture flows are the primary tool that is used to define interfaces in regional ITS architectures and project ITS architectures. Architecture flows and their communication requirements define the interfaces which form the basis for much of the ongoing standards work in the national ITS program. The terms "information flow" and "architecture flow" are used interchangeably.

From the main menu, select "Architecture", then "Physical Architecture" on the sub-menu, on the Physical Architecture page, select the "Architecture Flows" link to see a comprehensive list of architecture flows. View the Architecture Flows Page

 

Architecture Interconnect

Communications paths that carry information between subsystems and terminators in the physical architecture of the National ITS Architecture. Several different types of interconnects are defined in the National ITS Architecture to reflect the range of interface requirements in ITS. The majority of the interconnects are various types of communications links that are defined in the communications layer. Four different types of communications links are defined: Fixed Point - Fixed Point Communications, Wide Area Wireless (Mobile) Communications, Field - Vehicle Communications, and Vehicle - Vehicle Communications. In addition to these types, several specialized interconnects are also defined to reflect other interface requirements. These include human interface (e.g., what the system user sees and hears) and physical/environmental (e.g., what the ITS sensors sense).